Bali, the famed Island of the Gods, with its varied landscape of hills and mountains, rugged coastlines and sandy beaches, lush rice terraces and barren volcanic hillsides all providing a picturesque backdrop to its colourful, deeply spiritual and unique culture, stakes a serious claim to be paradise on earth. With world-class surfing and diving, a large number of cultural, historical and archaeological attractions, and an enormous range of accommodations, this is one of the world's most popular island destinations and one which consistently wins travel awards. Bali has something to offer a very broad market of visitors from young back-packers right through to the super-rich.
Bali is one of more than 17,000 islands in the indonesian archipelago and is located just over 2 kilometres (almost 1.5 miles) from the eastern tip of the island of Java and west of the island of Lombok. The island, home to about 4 million people, is approximately 144 kilometres (90 mi.) from east to west and 80 kilometres (50 mi.) north to south. The word "paradise" is used a lot in Bali and not without reason. The combination of friendly, hospitable people, a magnificently visual culture infused with spirituality and (not least) spectacular beaches with great surfing and diving have made Bali Indonesia's unrivaled number one tourist attraction. Eighty percent of international visitors to Indonesia visit Bali and Bali alone. The popularity is not without its flip sides—once paradisiacal Kuta has degenerated into a congested warren of concrete, touts and scammers live on overcharging tourists, and the island's visibility has even drawn the unwanted attention of terrorists in 2002 and 2005—but Bali has managed to retain its magic. Bali is a wonderful destination with something for everyone, and though heavily travelled, it is still easy to find some peace and quiet, if you likeThe popularity is not without its flip sides—once paradisiacal Kuta has degenerated into a congested warren of concrete, touts and scammers live on overcharging tourists, and the island's visibility has even drawn the unwanted attention of terrorists in 2002 and 2005—but Bali has managed to retain its magic. Bali is a wonderful destination with something for everyone, and though heavily travelled, it is still easy to find some peace and quiet, if you like. A consideration is the tourist season and Bali can get very crowded in July and August and again at Christmas and New Year. Australians also visit during school holidays in early April, late June and late September, while domestic tourists from elsewhere in Indonesia visit during national holidays. Outside these peak seasons, Bali can be surprisingly quiet and good discounts on accommodation are often available.

Daytime temperatures are pleasant, varying between 20 and 33 degrees Celsius (68 to 93 degrees Fahrenheit) year-round. From December to March, the west monsoon can bring heavy showers and high humidity, but days are still often sunny with the rains starting in the late afternoon or evening and passing quickly. From June to September, the humidity is low and it can be quite cool in the evenings. At this time of the year there is hardly any rain in the lowland coastal areas.

 

Even when it is raining across most of Bali, you can often enjoy sunny, dry days on the Bukit peninsula which receives far less rain than any other part of the island. On the other hand, in central Bali and in the mountains, you should not be surprised by cloudy skies and showers at any time of the year.

 

At higher elevations such as Bedugul or Kintamani, it gets distinctly chilly and you will need either a sweater or jacket after the sun sets.


The Indonesian currency is the Roupia. There is many BCA on the island especially in the main cities and tourist areas. To change monney: use only authorised money changers with proper offices and always ask for a receipt. The largest is called PT Central Kuta and they have several outlets. If you are especially nervous, then use a formal bank. You will get a better rate at an authorised money changer though. Avoid changing money in smaller currency exchange offices located within shops, as they more often than not will try to steal money by utilising very creative and "magician"-like methods. Often the rate advertised on the street is nowhere near the rate that they will give you in the end. Many times the rate is set higher to lure you in so that they can con you out of a banknote or two, and when this is not possible, they will give you a shoddy rate and state that the difference is due to commission. This even applies to the places which clearly state that there is no commission.

Electricity is supplied at 220V 50Hz. Outlets are the European standard CEE-7/7 "Schukostecker" or "Schuko" or the compatible, but non-grounded, CEE-7/16 "Europlug" types. American and Canadian travellers should pack a voltage-changing adapter for these outlets if they plan to use North American electrical equipment (although a lot of electronics with power adapters will work on 220 volts, check your equipment first).
The GSM netword is fine and it’s really not expensive to have a mobile. Regarding the landline, it depends of the area Of Bali
Bali Premium is offering to put you through owners or their management companies. Private villas are found mostly in the greater Seminyak area (Seminyak, Umalas, Canggu), in the south around Jimbaran and Uluwatu, in Sanur and around the hill town of Ubud. You can currently find some great villas in west, North and east Bali.

First, you have to tape 00.
Then, area Codes
Bali has six area codes.
•    0361: all of South bali  plus Gianyar, Tabanan and Ubud)
•    0362: Lovina, Pemuteran and Singaraja
•    0363: Amed, Candidasa, Karangasem, Kintamani, Padang Bai,  Tirta Gangga
•    0365: Negara, Gilimanuk, Medewi Beach, West Bali National Park
•    0366: Bangli, Besakih, Kintamani, Klungkung, Mount Agung, Nusa Ceningan, Nusa Lembongan, Nusa Penida
•    0368: Bedugul


It’s more more easy tu use internet in Bali especially with wireless connection. You can buy “vougher”  sent by some balenesa supplier and through a password, you are connected with the net.
Many internet café and restaurants are offering to use internet when you order something.

Bali is in the UTC+8 time zone (known in Indonesia as WITA, Waktu Indonesia Tengah), same as western Australia, Kuala Lumpur , Singapore, andHong Kong, and one hour ahead of  Jakarta

This section presents Bali villas own by a Bali resorts management company with their restaurants and/or their spa, fitness center, … . This selection of this type of Bali Villas can help you to find the best places for your holidays. You will also discover private estate which is managing between two and five villas. If you hesitate between private bali villas or a Bali Resort, please visit our advanced search functionality and it will be easier for you to take a decision.

Actual Balinese food is common on the island but it has made few inroads in the rest of the country due to its emphasis on pork, which is anathema to the largely Muslim population in the rest of the country. Notable dishes include:
•    Babi guling — roast suckling pig. A large ceremonial dish served with rice that is usually ordered several days in advance, but also often available at night market stalls and selected restaurants. A very notable outlet for babi guling is Ibu Oka's in Ubud.
•    Bebek betutu — literally "darkened duck", topped with a herb paste and roasted in banana leaves over charcoal. The same method can also be used for chicken, resulting in ayam betutu.
•    Lawar — covers a range of Balinese salads, usually involving thinly chopped vegetables, minced meat, coconut and spices. Traditionally, blood is mixed into this dish but it is often omitted for the more delicate constitutions of visitors. Green beans and chicken are a particularly common combination.
•    Sate lilit — minced seafood satay, served wrapped around a twig of lemongrass.
•    Urutan — Balinese spicy sausage, made from pork.

 

Independent villa: Villa which is not part of group of villas
Villa estate: Properties which offer a maximum of five independent villas. Each villa has its own pool and garden; the staff and some facilities can be shared.
Villas resort: Aparthotel or group of at least 5 contiguous villas which offer hotels services and common facilities (restaurant, spa, fitness center; each villa has its own pool and garden; architecture is generally similar.